Executive Minds 156| 7 Questions for Mentors and Mentees

Subscribe:

This week, Kevin and David tackle the idea of mentorship. One of the questions we’re asked most is “how do I find a mentor?” Because of this, we decided to pivot our organization towards providing those services to those leaders and entrepreneurs who are looking for that kind of relationship. In this episode, our hosts specifically talk through what you need to do to prepare for a mentorship opportunity; strategies to prepare to make the most of your relationship, whether someone is investing in your development, or you have the opportunity to invest in someone else.

In this episode of the Executive Minds, the MNTR team lays out 7 questions to better prepare both the mentor and the mentee to make the most of the time and experience.

What do you consider your genius to be? Tommy Newberry defines ‘genius’ as the intersection between your strength and your passion. Where does that intersection fall with you? Focus there.

What is an area of your work or personal life that needs development? Oftentimes, the gaps you can identify in your personal life translates to a weak spot in your work life. Identifying those will allow you to focus on areas in your life that can be developed.

What are the three best books you’ve read this year? Are you seeking knowledge on your own? Have you processed it enough to seek its application in your life? Reading allows you to commune with knowledge, and this question shows that you’re serious about that knowledge’s application in your life.

What is the professional achievement you’re most proud of this year? Andy Stanley has said that “experience is not the mother of knowledge, but evaluated experience.” With this question, you can gauge how high you’re aiming and get a sense of where you are in your development, compared with where you hope to be.

What are your goals right now? It’s important to keep what you’re working towards in the short term top of mind in order to be able to grow into your leadership roles. This question is a forced examination of your short term targets to better gauge what you’re working at right now.

Where do you see yourself in five years? Your short-term goals exist to serve your long-term goals. If you’re looking towards a goal in the long term but your immediate goals don’t serve that end, you reveal an opportunity to realign your trajectory to better aim at the correct target.

How can I help you most? All of these questions are data that the mentor can use, and helps the mentee be more prepared and intentional about the mentorship experience. If we can focus on what we want out of the experience, everyone can maximize their experience. This week, Kevin and David tackle the idea of mentorship. One of the questions we’re asked most is “how do I find a mentor?” Because of this, we decided to pivot our organization towards providing those services to those leaders and entrepreneurs who are looking for that kind of relationship. In this episode, our hosts specifically talk through what you need to do to prepare for a mentorship opportunity; strategies to prepare to make the most of your relationship, whether someone is investing in your development, or you have the opportunity to invest in someone else.

In this episode of the Executive Minds, the MNTR team lays out 7 questions to better prepare both the mentor and the mentee to make the most of the time and experience.

What do you consider your genius to be? Tommy Newberry defines ‘genius’ as the intersection between your strength and your passion. Where does that intersection fall with you? Focus there.

What is an area of your work or personal life that needs development? Oftentimes, the gaps you can identify in your personal life translates to a weak spot in your work life. Identifying those will allow you to focus on areas in your life that can be developed.

What are the three best books you’ve read this year? Are you seeking knowledge on your own? Have you processed it enough to seek its application in your life? Reading allows you to commune with knowledge, and this question shows that you’re serious about that knowledge’s application in your life.

What is the professional achievement you’re most proud of this year? Andy Stanley has said that “experience is not the mother of knowledge, but evaluated experience.” With this question, you can gauge how high you’re aiming and get a sense of where you are in your development, compared with where you hope to be.

What are your goals right now? It’s important to keep what you’re working towards in the short term top of mind in order to be able to grow into your leadership roles. This question is a forced examination of your short term targets to better gauge what you’re working at right now.

Where do you see yourself in five years? Your short-term goals exist to serve your long-term goals. If you’re looking towards a goal in the long term but your immediate goals don’t serve that end, you reveal an opportunity to realign your trajectory to better aim at the correct target.

How can I help you most? All of these questions are data that the mentor can use, and helps the mentee be more prepared and intentional about the mentorship experience. If we can focus on what we want out of the experience, everyone can maximize their experience. .